Gorgeous Yorkshire Header Image

In search of the perfect bird feeder

October 12, 2014
This woven bird house/feeder costs £6 at Homebase.

This woven bird house/feeder costs £6 at Homebase.

This weekend I have been mostly thinking about the birds and (as an offshoot) the bees.
I’m talking about a bird feeder, for the garden. I was inspired last weekend when the cheekiest little Robin Redbreast perched itself on the front garden fence as I was pottering about, obviously watching me, very interested (makes a change in this household). Then it flew over to the opposite fence and did the same.
I felt sorry I didn’t have anything in the garden for it to eat, as I assume that’s what it was after. I’ve seen it a few times since too, although not in the last couple of days, which is starting to concern me. I do hope none of the local cats have got hold of it already. I was looking forward to a winter and hopefully a Christmas of robin watching. I was going to think of a name and everything …
Anyway, I decided the front garden and the back yard both needed bird feeders, because I’d like to entice this robin back and maybe attract other birds too. But I certainly didn’t want a nasty plastic and wire tubular thing, which seems to make up the majority of garden bird feeders.
First stop, I went to Crimple Hall Garden Centre – www.crimplehallgardencentre.co.uk – and found a decent selection, at various price ranges. I especially liked one that costs £19.95, below, a blue and white simple wooden hut, but felt it was a little too large and white for my outdoor spaces, although it would suit somewhere with clean modern lines.

Wooden blue and white bird house, £19.95 at Crimple Hall Garden Centre in Harrogate.

Wooden blue and white bird house, £19.95 at Crimple Hall Garden Centre in Harrogate.

I noticed that there were bee houses too, little ones, made up of hollow reeds within a hut-like frame, to give bees little spaces to do whatever it is that they do. I intend to read up about them and they may well become my next purchase and project.

Bird house and bee house, bith available at Crimple Hall Garden Centre in Harrogate.

Bird house and bee house, both available at Crimple Hall Garden Centre in Harrogate.

I’ve also found a very stylish bee house that looks really good, from www.thegreatgiftcompany.co.uk and it costs just £11. I have no idea where the correct positioning might be for bee houses, and what time of year is best to try to attract bees into the garden, and I certainly have no idea how to entice them, but this sounds likes a great field to explore. If you have any advice, please let me know.

Bee house, £11, at www.thegreatgiftcompany.co.uk.

Bee house, £11, at www.thegreatgiftcompany.co.uk.

Anyway, back to finding the perfect bird feeder. In the end, I found what I was looking for at trusty old Homebase. I bought a wicker woven hanging bird house which looks very in keeping, restful and bucolic, hanging from our apple tree in the front garden garden (see at the top of the post) – I love looking at it from the front room window. I’ve put peanuts in it, so I hope Mr Robin approves (probably doing it all wrong – again, please let me know if you have any advice).

I found a simple wire bird feeder too at Homebase for £4.99 – again, I have filled it with peanuts. I’ve put this in the back yard, although I’m not hopeful, as I have never ever seen a bird in there. Perhaps it’s the cats again.

Wire ball bird feeder costs £4.99 at Homebase. Here it is in my back yard.

Wire ball bird feeder costs £4.99 at Homebase. Here it is in my back yard.

I also bought a couple of half coconuts filled with fat and meal worms (sounds revolting). Homebase have them on at buy one, get one free (£1.79). One of them I have hung from an old ceramic hot air balloon. I’ve had it in a cupboard for years and I think it was originally from Habitat. The little ceramic basket and its occupants vanished long ago, but I didn’t want to throw it away, so here it is, at the bottom of the garden, hanging from a tree with a half coconut of meal worms beneath it. Such is life.
Now I am waiting for the birds to come, although, oddly, I haven’t seen or heard a single bird all day. Still no sign of the robin. Maybe I just have to be patient. But I will have my camera at the ready if they do come. If you have any advice about the birds and the bees, please email us on gorgeousyorkshire@gmail.com.

My ceramic hot air balloon and its meal worm passenger.

My ceramic hot air balloon and its meal worm passenger.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*